9 Worst Fashion Trends From History

  • Jun 21, 2019

Fashion has its share of lows in history. There were moments when a new fashion trend became popular for the wrong reason and people phased it after some time.

Whether it is the backbreaking corset from the early 1900s or the ridiculously long chopines, the history of fashion has many examples of trends that look odd even today. Some of them deserve a mention here:

 

1. Corset

One of the weirdest fashion items of the early twentieth century, corset was a necessity for the women in the past to look slim and petite. The item could press their waist for several inches to help them achieve the hour-glass figure. But it came at the cost of broken ribs, deformed spine and damage to internal organs.

Besides, it took a good amount of time for the women to lace this clothing piece around their waist. Corset faded from the fashion scene during the 1920s as the women started using the better inner alternatives to accentuate their body. 

However, corset continued to be part of women’s clothing as a prop to support their outfit. It is commonly used underneath the gowns to get the right style for the dress.

 

2. Hobble Skirt

The idea of hobble skirt was conceived by the French designer Paul Poiret who saw Mrs. Hart O. Berg, an American lady who boarded on the airplane invented by the Wright Brothers. Before she got on the plane, she tied the skirt at the ankles with a string to avoid it from getting blown by the air. So when she got off the plane, Paul noticed her dress and got impressed by its look.

The French designer is credited with commercially introducing the first hobble skirt, though this claim is disputed. The lack of mobility is one downside of this dress that eventually led to its decline in popularity during World War I since the women needed less restrictive dress to work as a volunteer in the war. It is still remembered as one of the hottest trend of the early 1900s era.

 

3. Lotus Shoes

Lotus shoes are originated from China where they were used by women who have bound feet. The shoes got its name since they resembled the lotus bud. The shoes had wedge-shaped soles to accommodate the feet of the women. They are adorned with imageries of animals and used floral patterns as decorations.

The shoes had long been a part of female clothing in China where bound feet were considered a sign of opulence and beauty. However, the use of lotus shoes was banned in China in 1912. However, they remained a symbol of the traditional clothing of China and are exhibited in many museums of the country.

 

4. Denim Jackets With Random Patches

In the past decades, donning a denim jackets with random patches was considered a fad. While patches look great on denim jackets but only when they have a meaning. Putting too many custom patches on a jacket without a purpose didn’t look stylish in the past and it doesn’t look stylish even today.

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5. White Gloves

white gloves were once a fashion thing for no obvious reasons. We have seen the doctors and surgeons wearing these gloves for the many practical reasons but how could they be a style statement? They remained popular for a brief period of time but lost popularity soon after.

 

6. Patchwork Peasant Skirt

Patchwork peasant skirts were “in” during the 1970s when the boho culture was in full swing. Patchwork peasant skirt was inspired from the hippie’s culture who adapted this dress during the Edwardian era. 

Unlike random custom patches on a denim jacket, a patchwork peasant skirt has patches of various patterns and colors all over the cloth. It lost popularity after the much glamorous versions of skirts started dominating the wardrobe of the women.

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7. Chopines

Chopines became popular in Venice during the 17th century where they were worn by the women to keep their feet and clothes protected from the muddy water. They soon got a liking among the women who started wearing bigger chopines as a symbol of social status. 

The women with higher social status would prefer wearing the higher chopines. They were lost their popularity after women suffered injuries due to the height of the shoes. Today, they are considered one of the most iconic shoes in history of fashion.

 

8. Crakowes

Crakowes were a rage during the 15th century when they were worn by the men. They were named after a city of Poland from where the shoes were originated. They are also referred as the poulaine. The shoes were unique for their pointed beaks.

Like the other ancient shoes in this list, crakowes were also considered a symbol of social status in the past. Since the shoes were too long, they were dangerous to wear by everyone and the size of the shoes were restricted according to the social class of the wearer. The nobility was allowed to wear a crakowes with a size to up to 2 feet, while the peasants could only wear a half-feet-long crakowes.

 

9. Sagging

Showing your underwear during the 1990s was considered a cool thing in America. It was called “sagging” at the time and was introduced by the skaters who would wear pants too low in the public. The trend grew in popularity throughout the 1990s. 

However, the different states, institutions and organizations in U.S banned the practice since it exposed the bottom to the onlookers. Nonetheless, the trend is still practice in some parts of the world. But we have to agree that the trend was in bad taste.

Being fashionable means being aesthetic and an aesthetic thing has to be universal and timeless. These fashion trends declined in popularity either because they were impractical, socially taboo or over the top. Whatever the reason, the majority of the people would agree that these are some of the worst fashion trends from history.

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